GeoMetro Goldwyn Mayer; Makin’ Certain... Just Saying; Classical Decomposition; “Creature From The Blackjack Lagoon” Franco-Italian Farrago!

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 3(7!) SERVED

Schpuzzle Of TheWeek:
Classical decomposition

Take the last name of a composer and the title of one of the composer’s works. 
Read these words to yourself as if they were instuctions. 
These instructions, if followed, would result in a clump of thread. 
Who is the composer and what is the work?

Appetizer Menu
Double-Meaning Appetizer:
Makin’ certain... just saying

Think of a well-known four-word saying. 
The second and fourth words of the saying, placed side-by-side, describe how certain things are made. 
What’s the saying, and how are certain things made?
Hint: The meanings of the second and fourth words of the saying are both different from their meanings in the description of how certain things are made.


MENU
Simmerin’ Summertime Slice:
GeoMetro Goldwyn Mayer

Name a two-word geometrical term that has a numerical property that might remind you of a hot summer day. 
Rearrange the combined letters of these two words to spell two one-time-hot past Hollywood surnames that might remind you of a pair of military leaders who had a rivalry that, if not heated, was at least simmering below the surface.
What geometrical figure is this?
What are the Hollywood surnames?
Who are the military leaders?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Franco-Italian farrago! 

Will Shortz’s August 16th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Think of a major city in France whose name is an anagram of a major city in Italy. Each city has more than 100,000 people.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Egotistical Heavyweight champ Apollo Creed selects a journeyman boxer named Rocky Balboa as his opponent in a boxing bout in defense of his title. Balboa, an overwhelming underdog trains hard in preparation. 
The challenger actually knocks Creed down in the first round. Creed starts taking Balboa more seriously for the remainder of the fight, with both pugilists sustaining various injuries. 
Balboa suffers relentless blows to the head, sustaining eye-swelling that nearly blinds him. His trainer must cut Balboa’s right eyelid so that he can see! Creed continues pummeling Balboa, who staggers but absorbs each punch and refuses to go down...
At his point in this 1976 Oscar-winning movie, set in Philadelphia during America’s Bicentennial year, theater-goers must have been thinking to themselves, “Can _____ ___ ___?”
Rearranging the combined eleven letters in the three missing words of that thoughtful query do not spell “Philadelphia.” But they do spell a different well-known American city.
What is it?  
ENTREE #2:
Think of a major city in South America whose name can be anagrammed into an adjective and proper noun that describe Roy, but not Orson. 
What is this city?
ENTREE #3:
Think of a major city in a transcontinental nation whose name is anagrams into two words for the same human body part. 
What city is this?
Hint: One of the words is a slang term.
ENTREE #4:
Think of a major “city” in Asia whose name is an anagram of two sounds that visitors to that city may hear. 
What city is this?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a major city in Western Europe whose name can be anagrammed into a two-word caption that would not be truthful if it were to be used in what is being advertised in the dual image pictured here.
What is this city?
What would be the untruthful caption?
Hint: The city has quite a few more than 100,000 people. It is known for its architecture and art.    
ENTREE #6:
Think of a city in Great Britain whose name can be anagrammed to form two words that describe any person who prefers to lose weight not through healthy dieting or exercise but via surgery. 
What is this city?
What is the two-word description?
Hint: The first word in the anagram is an informal word.
ENTREE #7:
Think of a major city in Africa whose name can be anagrammed into a two-word caption for the image pictured here. 
What is this city?
What is the caption?
Hint: The city has quite a few more than 100,000 people.
ENTREE #8:
Think of a major city in Africa.  
Its first four letters can be anagrammed into a  mechanical term associated with the center of a wheel.
Its remaining letters can be anagrammed into a  geometrical term associated with the center of a circle.  
What is this city?
What are the two terms?
Hint: The city has quite a few more than 100,000 people.
ENTREE #9:
Write down a major city in the United States, followed by its U.S. Postal Service state abbreviation. 
These letters can be rearranged to form two words that belong in the blanks of a caption for the dual image pictured here. 
The caption reads: “How to ____ a ________”
What is this city?
What are the missing words in the caption?


Dessert Menu
“Quit Dealing Dem Damn Deuces!” Dessert:
“Creature from the Blackjack Lagoon”

Name a phrase you might hear at a blackjack table. 
Invert one letter and rearrange the result to form the title of a classic creature feature film. 
What is the film title?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

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